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alchemist

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The injury that changed Luke Vella's career


all the best, champ
 

alchemist

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HALL OF FAME /


Details of Inductees in the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs Hall of Fame.

Eddie Burns - Player No.16

A local junior who joined the club in the inaugural year went on to play 221 games (1935-50) for the club before then coaching the first grade side for three seasons (1960-62).
Burns was a mobile tough forward who had a reputation for his try scoring ability, mainly through his support play.
He scored 62 tries across 16 seasons, including four in one game against Newtown in 1942.
Eddie Burns
Eddie Burns

Les Johns - Player No. 284

Johns joined Canterbury in 1963 and played nine seasons (1963-71) in the blue and white as a fullback who also had the goal kicking duties.
He scored 14 tries, kicked 233 goals, 19 field goals and scored a total of 545 points during his time at Canterbury.
The brilliant number one played in the 1967 Grand Final, winning the Clive Churchill medal.
Les played 15 games for NSW from 1962 to 1969 and played 14 Tests for Australia from 1963 to 1969.
Les is considered to be Canterbury's greatest ever fullback after being named in the Berries to Bulldogs 70 Year Team of Champions in 2004 and is ranked alongside Terry Lamb and Steve Mortimer as the club's greatest player.
On April 1 2007, he was inducted into the Bulldogs Ring of Champions and on February 22 2008, Les was named in the 100 Greatest Players as part of the centenary year celebrations.
Les Johns
Les Johns

Dr George Peponis - Player No. 402

Peponis moved to Australia as an 18 month old and became entrenched in the Canterbury area.
He joined Canterbury in 1972 as a hooker and played 11 seasons (1972-82) as well as being captain of the club for five years that included the 1980 Premiership.
He captained Canterbury on 71 occasions between 1978 and 1982 and was named at hooker in the Berries to Bulldogs 70 Year Team of Champions in 2004.
George played seven games for NSW from 1976 to 1980 and played for Australia in eight Tests from 1978 to 1980.
The premiership winning captain scored 27 tries from his 132 first grade appearances and is a member of the ‘Ring of Champions’
Dr George Peponis
Dr George Peponis

Steve Mortimer - Player No. 413

Mortimer, the brother of Peter and Chris held the halfback position at the club for 13 seasons (1976-88) making 272 appearances.
‘Turvey’ captained the club to the 1984 and 1985 Premierships and was also a member of the 1980 and 1988 victories. He claimed the Clive Churchill Medal in the 1985 premiership win over St George.
He played 15 games for NSW between 1977 and 1985, leading NSW to their first State of Origin series win in 1985. The brilliant number seven played eight Tests for Australia and was a member of the 1982 Kangaroos.
Steve is considered to be the best halfback to play for Canterbury after being named in the Berries to Bulldogs 70 Year Team of Champions in 2004.
On April 1 2007, he was inducted into the Bulldogs Ring of Champions and on February 22 2008, Steve was named in the 100 Greatest Players as part of the centenary year celebrations.
A Life Member of the Football Club and in 2019, he was inducted into the NSWRL Hall of Fame.
Steve Mortimer
Steve Mortimer

Terry Lamb - Player No. 477

A local junior from the Chester Hill Hornets, Lamb was the five-eighth of the club for 13 seasons making 262 appearances, with 121 of those as captain.
A member of the 1984, 1988 and 1995 premiership winning teams, captaining the 95 team to victory over the Manly Sea Eagles.
In 1993, Terry became the first Canterbury player to score 100 first grade tries and finished his career at the Bulldogs with 123 tries, 375 goals, 37 field goals and 1279 points.
‘Baa’ was named captain and five-eighth of the Berries to Bulldogs 70 Year Team of Champions and is ranked alongside Steve Mortimer and Les Johns as the club's greatest player.
Inducted into the Bulldogs Ring of Champions and was named in the 100 Greatest Players as part of the centenary year celebrations.
Lamb played eight games for NSW from 1981 to 1989, seven Tests for Australia from 1986 to 1988 and played in every game of the 1986 Kangaroo tour.
He collected the Dally M five-eighth of the year six times during his time at Canterbury and claimed the Rothmans Medal in 1984.
Terry Lamb
Terry Lamb

Hall of Fame - Bulldogs
 

alchemist

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Iconic halves pairing and a goal-kicking sensation: Ennis’ all-time Bulldogs team
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Michael Ennis named his all-time Bulldogs side and his former teammate Hazem El Masri got a spot on the wing.
Michael Ennis named his all-time Bulldogs side and his former teammate Hazem El Masri got a spot on the wing.Source: News Limited

Fox League expert and former Bulldog Michael Ennis faced the tough task of naming his all-time Bulldogs team and he’s come up with an impressive outfit that has the likes of iconic halves Terry Lamb and Steve Mortimer while also acknowledging modern-day players Hazem El Masri, Josh Morris Andrew Ryan and James Graham.

Selecting the best from 85 years worth of players is no mean feat. Possibly the easiest of all the selections though was Terry Lamb and Steve Mortimer – the legendary halves duo.
“They pick themselves without a doubt,” Ennis told Fox Sports.
“Terry Lamb is the greatest of all time in terms of Bulldogs and Steve Mortimer is not far behind him. They’re as good a halves pairing as you can get.
https://www.foxsports.com.au/nrl/nrl-premiership/match-centre/

Steve Mortimer landed a spot in Ennis’ all-time Bulldogs team.
Steve Mortimer landed a spot in Ennis’ all-time Bulldogs team.Source: News Corp Australia
Ennis’ back line has a healthy mix of old and new. Les Johns, a fullback with plenty of swagger from the 60s, nifty centres Chris Mortimer and Andrew Farrar from the club’s dominance in the 80s along with goalkicking sensation Hazem El Masri and most recent Bulldog Josh Morris.
“Obviously the experience there of (Chris) Mortimer, (Andrew) Farrar and (Les) Johns, the names that were common among the people I spoke to were those three.
“That centre pairing (Mortimer and Farrar) had was just so tough, aggressive and dominant throughout that successful era of the 80s.
“I played with both Hazem and Josh. El Masri was a wonderful pointscorer and a great finisher and I just had to find a spot for Josh Morris because he’s just such a quality player and a quality teammate.”

Hazem El Masri is arguably the best goal-kicker the game has ever seen.
Hazem El Masri is arguably the best goal-kicker the game has ever seen.Source: News Limited
Up front, Ennis has picked a brutal pack including former teammate and fellow club captain James Graham.
“I loved playing with James Graham, he was just heart and soul every week and has great skill,” Ennis said.
“He came over and played that unorthodox English type of game that we really hadn’t seen a lot of and I think what he implimented when he came over is still very much part of the way a lot of front-rowers are expected to play in the modern game with his ball-playing.
“It was just his toughness and competitiveness that made pulling on a jersey alongside him so special every week”
Up next is hooker. Ennis has given the No. 9 jersey that he wore for six seasons to George Peponis, but this wasn’t an easy decision.
“The dummy half position was tough.
“To be fair I never saw a lot of George Peponis play but he’s a huge part of the fabric at Canterbury, he’s a very successful dummy half and I had a lot of people from that era speak glowingly about him.
“But there’s Jason Hetherington as well. He was there in that era where I really fell in love with the game through the 90s, he was really crafty, great service from dummy half and ultra tough.”
The backrow is full of incredible work ethic and has one player Ennis idolised as a kid.
Michael Ennis named former captain Andrew Ryan in his team.
Michael Ennis named former captain Andrew Ryan in his team.Source: News Corp Australia
“Andrew Ryan was one of the great players that I played with, he was just super consistent and skilful and one of those blokes that got through so much work for the team that went unrecognised by a lot of people but was cherished by his teammates.
“David Gillespie, well no one ran near him he was a weapon.
“And Jim Dymock, I remember being a young boy down at the footy oval and I used to shave my head and wear No. 13 because I wanted to be like Jim Dymock.
“He was just ultra tough but had great skill, one of those traditional ball-playing locks.
“I was lucky enough to work alongside him when he became assistant coach and his footy brain is as good as I’ve experienced.”
Ennis idolised Jim Dymock growing up.
Ennis idolised Jim Dymock growing up.Source: News Corp Australia
The talent doesn’t simmer down on the bench, in fact Ennis turns the intensity up a notch.
“You’ve got the toughness of (Dean) Pay and (Mark) O’Meley and then you get a bit of both with (Darren) Britt in terms of his offloading and his ball-playing.
“(Steve) Folkes was just heart and soul of Canterbury. Everyone you talk to whether it be players or whether it was when he was coaching he was just Canterbury. He was everything they stood for.”
Ennis even squeezed in an 18th man – Jason Smith.
“I know it’s No. 18 but I just had to find a spot. I loved him as a player.”
While he’s picked an excellent team, Ennis struggled leaving out a number of players.
“It could have been quite easy to pick two teams with the success and the quality of the players at the Bulldogs,” he said.
“There were a number of players that were really tough to leave out.
“A lot of people from those early eras said Kevin Ryan and in my time watching Willie Mason, Sonny Bill Williams, Paul Langmack, Steve Price, there’s so many guys.
“For me, Josh Reynolds was hard to leave out because playing with him he was the Steve Folkes for us, he was Canterbury. He played and delivered like a Bulldog.”
“I found it really challenging. I enjoyed parts of it but I also found it uncomfortable just because of the decisions you have to make and the players you have to leave out but over all I think it’s an incredible side.”
Michael Ennis named his all-time Bulldogs team


NRL 2020: Canterbury Bulldogs, Michael Ennis, best team, all-time, Steve Mortimer, Terry Lamb, Josh Morris, Hazem El Masri, James Graham | Fox Sports

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as much as it pains me, Mason and SBW belong in an all time 'Dogs 17
 
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alchemist

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Legend Q&A: Jason Hetherington
NRL.com 18 May 2020, 01:14 PM

If there was ever a moment to turn a whole country against you, Jason Hetherington's larrikin nature came out in 2001 when he was asked what was the best thing about London during his time with the Super League side.

"The departure gates at Heathrow airport," Hetherington joked.
Such was Hetherington's infectious personality, he's built a strong rapport across the game since hanging up the boots in 2002.

And yes, even in the northern hemisphere.

Hetherington started his career as a playmaker and was identified as an understudy to Wally Lewis and Terry Lamb early in his career before establishing himself as an under-rated hooker.

Many pundits say if not for the strong crop of players around at the time (in particular Maroons hooker Steve Walters and Andrew Johns, who often wore the Australian No.9 jersey), Hetherington would've played far more than the 10 representative games to his name.


NRL.com caught up with Hetherington recently for a quick trip down memory lane and to find out what else he's up to in rugby league retirement.

You were born in Baralaba, near Rockhampton in Queensland, what was your childhood like and in particular with rugby league?

Baralaba is a small town with about 150 people and I grew up on a small property there. There was only footy and cricket on offer to play. We would travel a five-hour round trip just to get our footy fix in each weekend.
I made the Queensland under 12s schoolboys side while I was still living in Baralaba which was a huge honour back in those days. I was Queensland halfback and Geoff Toovey was NSW halfback – 20 years later I was Queensland hooker and he was NSW hooker in Origin.
Jason Hetherington during his Origin career.
Jason Hetherington during his Origin career

You spent the first season of your first-grade career at the Gold Coast but lost all 15 of your matches – what was that initiation like?

I went to boarding school in Rockhampton when I left Baralaba at 13 and all they had was rugby union. I ended up playing for Australia and pursued union early on. I played a chance game of league with my brother in law, signed with Ipswich for a season and then Wally Lewis signed me up to the Gold Coast soon after that.

It was a wonderful experience, to get coached by Wally and play alongside blokes like Peter Gill, Steve Jackson and Terry Cook. The first game I had to mark Terry Lamb in a trial against Canterbury at the old ANZ Stadium. I'll never forget the nerves and excitement that day.
How did the move to Sydney with the Bulldogs come about in 1994 and were there any regrets of not being able to play for another Queensland club like the Broncos or Cowboys being a local boy?

The Broncos were pretty tied up with players but I had an opportunity to go up to the Cowboys with Grant Bell when I was still on the Gold Coast. They were starting up the franchise and he took a few guys with him and wanted to know if I was interested too.
Jason Hetherington in action for Canterbury.
Jason Hetherington in action for Canterbury.©NRL Photos

Canterbury had already made an approach so I made a commitment there. I went and saw Wally because I was just a young fella playing footy and I didn't have a manager.

He broke it all down for me and went through the dynamics of all clubs and said the way I play footy and what the Bulldogs were looking for, Canterbury would suit the way I play. I took that on board and they flew me down there.

I was playing five-eighth in those days and got recruited for when Terry retired to take his spot. They gave me a go [at hooker] when Geordi Peats got injured. Marty Bella and Billy Johnson recommended me to Chris Anderson and said this bloke would make a fair hooker. I got the opportunity and made the most of it.
The departure gates at Heathrow airport
The highlight of Jason Hetherington's time in the Super League
The 1998 season was another special year when you earned Australian selection and scored a try on debut – what else do you remember about that time?

We limped along that season at the Bulldogs and there were some disruptive periods with the Super League dramas and players all involved in that. We beat Illawarra through a Craig Polla-Mounter field goal in Wollongong and things went from there.
Brisbane got us in the grand final but from the personal side of things it was a great season for me. I played for Queensland and Australia for the first time and I remember thinking how all the hard work and knocks were all worth those moments.

With the Australian selection, Garry Hughes came down and told me while I was in the pool swimming that Wayne Bennett wanted me to fly to New Zealand and play in this Tri-series game but said there was only one problem - that there were no seats left on the plane.
I replied that I was prepared to be tied to the plane's wing to get over there, I didn't care, but he was only stirring me up.
It was a good side with Alf (Allan Langer) there, Timmy Brasher, Andrew Johns, Darren Lockyer, Steve Menzies and Gorden Tallis – I just remember thanking Wayne for the opportunity and said I wouldn't let him down.
Jason Hetherington in action for the Maroons.
Jason Hetherington in action for the Maroons.©NRL Photos

You moved to London to join the Broncos in 2001 – how did that switch come about and how did you find the overseas experience, especially back then?

I'd never been to the UK before and had a hell of a time. It was a bit of an adventure for me, something different with the colder weather, the style of footy and culture.
I was getting to the age where I had to do it then or I might not have got another opportunity to go again. I linked up with Jim Dymock again and we had a good crew of guys.
I remember going onto the UK version of the footy show, which Ray Warren's son Chris used to host, and I told him I was very cultured and loved going to museums and was into arts. For anyone who knows me, that's not true. I'm just a typical country bloke.
Anyway, I got asked what was the best part of London and I said probably the departure gates at Heathrow, for a laugh. It didn't go down too well, I had about 100 phone calls by the time I left the studio. They didn't take it too lightly and thought look at this bloke bagging out the English culture.

You were part of some great Origin clashes but does anything in particular stand out for you?

The physical aspect of the game itself and the expectations behind pulling the jersey on was two things I admired, with the anticipation that everyone has and the responsibilities that it brings.

You've got 34 of the world's best players and with that ingredients, you get a strong showing. If you don't walk off sore you haven't had a crack. I look forward to Origin every year, from when I was an 11-year-old in 1980 to now.

What about the infamous scrums in Origin that used to break out into brawls?

Oh, you had to get yourself ready for it, you certainly couldn't get caught by surprise but I always thought winning the game was more important.
You'd prepare for a stink if it came but that was the beauty of Origin – the physical battle and intensity. You'd find something in you that you never thought you had. It finds the best in you and sometimes that just spills over. It was all part of the game.
We would travel a five-hour round trip just to get our footy fix in each weekend
Hetherington's junior career included plenty of travel.
You're still part of Origin as coach of the Queensland Maroons women's side – that must be something different for you but also just as rewarding?

It's been terrific, they're a great bunch of women and really buy into what we've put in front of them over the past few years. We've been close but are not quite there. I thought last year if we were good enough we could've got the job done.
We have to get better to beat NSW. But it's a great experience and the support staff are great. There's a lot of interest in it and it's a great thing. State of Origin means as much to the girls as it does to anyone.
They grew up watching it like everyone else. I look at Steph Hancock, whose father Rohan played in the first game in 1980. It has a massive meaning for her.
Jason Hetherington during his Origin career.
Jason Hetherington during his Origin career.©NRL Photos

What does retirement look like now for Jason Hetherington?

I'm back in Rockhampton running my own water truck business which I started not long after I retired. Dad is out on the cattle property still so I head there and give him a hand every now and then.
I've got twin boys - Zac was with Canterbury but he's back with Ipswich now. The other twin, Kobe, spent some time with the Broncos. My daughter Laynii is studying occupational therapy and I see her as an investment into my future.

I've also got a little fella Eli in year 11 nearing the end of school so just living normal everyday life and staying involved in rugby league when I can.

Legend Q&A: Jason Hetherington - NRL
 

DogsOfWar1704

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I know it's only Clarkey but it's good to see him write some positives about the Dogs.
The dickhead usually writes us off.FB_IMG_1612434920890.jpgFB_IMG_1612434928552.jpgFB_IMG_1612434933053.jpgFB_IMG_1612434937322.jpgFB_IMG_1612434942106.jpgFB_IMG_1612434951174.jpg
 

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I know it's only Clarkey but it's good to see him write some positives about the Dogs.
The dickhead usually writes us off.View attachment 21024View attachment 21025View attachment 21026View attachment 21027View attachment 21028View attachment 21029
Clarky reckons we are overrated yet the titans are shoe in for the 8 in his eyes because they have made some signings... Broncos had Fifita and they still come last. I hope titans succeed but he thinks they are so far ahead of us lol
 

DogsOfWar1704

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Clarky reckons we are overrated yet the titans are shoe in for the 8 in his eyes because they have made some signings... Broncos had Fifita and they still come last. I hope titans succeed but he thinks they are so far ahead of us lol
That because he's a titans fan. Can't wait to beat the titans just to rub it in his face
 

DogsOfWar1704

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Clarky reckons we are overrated yet the titans are shoe in for the 8 in his eyes because they have made some signings... Broncos had Fifita and they still come last. I hope titans succeed but he thinks they are so far ahead of us lol
He fucks himself up all the time.
Like saying we're the most overrated club going into 2021 yet we're spoon favourites.
And then posts that saying half our players will be most improved haha.
 
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